parent researching behavioral health treatment options on laptop

Mental Health Resources for Parents

You want your child to feel their happiest every day. However, chronic or sudden stressors can take a toll on their mental health. While these situations can be challenging to navigate, your children and family aren’t alone. As you’ll see, there are many free mental health resources for teens and parents alike.

Learn More About Supporting Your Children

As a parent or caregiver, you’re one of your child’s most dependable sources of guidance and support. Let them know you’re there for them by recognizing when they’re struggling and offering practical assistance.

Advice for Parents

Depression

LGBTQ+

Mental Health

Suicidal Thoughts

Racism

Talking to Each Other

Self Harm

Back-To-School

Interviews

BPD

Anxiety

DMDD

Advice for Parents

How to Manage Holiday Stress

How to Manage Holiday Stress

We can often feel pressure to make the holiday season perfect. Finding the perfect gift, throwing the perfect party, making the perfect meal. All of this can leave us feeling stressed and anxious. So, with the holidays...

Talking to Your Kids About Feelings

Talking to Your Kids About Feelings

Many families have experienced some sort of disruption these past few months. Having conversations about social isolation, ways to stay safe in public spaces, or global and national news can bring up feelings like confusion, stress, or uncertainty. In preparation for...

Top Reasons Children Act Out

Top Reasons Children Act Out

Kids have rough days. Children can display less-than-perfect behaviors for a variety of reasons. Maybe they're tired, disappointed, or frustrated. Perhaps they've eaten too much sugar or are exhausted from a particularly grueling day at school. But what if the rough...

Mental Health

What Does Self-Care Really Mean?

What Does Self-Care Really Mean?

Self-care has become a hot topic in recent years and rightfully so! Taking the time to care for ourselves is so crucial to not only our mental health but our overall wellness. But what is self-care really? A bubble bath or vacation may come to mind; however, self-care...

Communication

How to Talk to Friends and Family About Your Mental Illness

It can be difficult to talk about mental illness with family and friends. There is a negative stigma in our society attached to people with mental health issues. You may want to discuss mental illness with friends, for instance, but fear harsh judgments. When a mental illness becomes part of your life, either through personal experience or from one of your children, it is helpful to know how to talk to your friends and family about it. Learn how here!

Emily Acker and Gaan Akers of Hillside on The Weekly Checkup

Emily Acker and Gaan Akers of Hillside on The Weekly Checkup

 Speaker  0:00   Welcome to the weekly checkup brought to you by Georgia neurology. I'm your host, Dr. Bruce Feinberg. And there are a few areas of healthcare that have had so few advancements that get so little attention, as does mental health, it's been talked...

Anxiety

February Newsletter

February Newsletter

Love is in the air and the shops are full of cards and candy. Valentine’s Day can be fun, but it can also be a difficult time for people who might be struggling with personal relationships. The most important relationship we have, is with ourselves. Let’s look at how...

Ways to Help Reduce Your Child’s Holiday Stress

Ways to Help Reduce Your Child’s Holiday Stress

We can often feel pressurized to make the holiday season perfect. Finding the perfect gift, throwing the perfect party, making the perfect meal. All of this can leave us feeling stressed and anxious. So, with the holidays approaching, how do we make sure that we enjoy...

The Link Between Physical and Mental Health

The Link Between Physical and Mental Health

Staying healthy is a central goal in many people's lives, and parents want to promote good health for their children in any way they can. Health advice is everywhere, but much of it focuses only on the body. As researchers continue to investigate what influences our...

Depression

Suicidal Thoughts & Self Harm

Why Do Individuals Self-Harm?

Why Do Individuals Self-Harm?

Self-harm is a common behavior, particularly among young people. It's estimated that approximately 18% of adolescents overall have harmed themselves intentionally. Females are at greatest risk of engaging in self-injury, with nearly 24% of female adolescents having...

Warning Signs of Suicidal Thinking in Youth — How to Reduce the Chances

Warning Signs of Suicidal Thinking in Youth — How to Reduce the Chances

The threat of suicide is often one of the main concerns for families with loved ones struggling with depression. If your child has suicidal thoughts without active plans, an outpatient mental health facility & professional should be contacted right away. Hillside’s Day Treatment and Intensive Outpatient has clinicians who are skilled in working with children and adolescents who struggle with suicidal ideations. Read More

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD)

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Mood Dysregulation (DMDD)

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LGBTQ+

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Racism

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Back-To-School

How to Work Through College Application Anxiety

How to Work Through College Application Anxiety

Do you have a child who excessively worries about the college application process, so much to the point where they lose sleep or experience headaches? Applying to college can be a stressful experience for teens, especially when they must balance homework and...

Additional Resources

Signs of Mental Health Challenges

Children and adolescents may have difficulty expressing their emotions, so it’s essential to recognize when they need help.

Look for the following signs:

  • Sadness or isolation for more than two weeks
  • Life-threatening behaviors, which may include having suicidal thoughts and gestures
  • Engaging in activities that can harm themselves or others
  • Intense anxiety that impacts their daily activities
  • Mood swings
  • Sudden behavioral or personality changes

Certain situations can be difficult for children to understand and cope with. Pay close attention to your child’s behavior if they’ve recently experienced life-changing events such as parent separation or moving to a new location or school.

What to Do Next

If you notice concerning behaviors, you should consult your child’s health care providers. They have the expertise and resources to give your child the care they need. These professionals include doctors, school nurses, primary care physicians and specialists.

Depending on the situation, your next step may be:

  • Getting more information: Mental health is rarely straightforward, and it’s okay to have questions and concerns. Your child’s healthcare provider can offer more insight into their behaviors and symptoms.
  • Seeking further evaluation: Ask their primary care physician if an evaluation is necessary and how to get in touch with a child behavior specialist.
  • Consulting your child’s specialist: Your child’s specialist may have prior experience with their symptoms and can assist you directly or connect you with other professionals.
  • Exploring treatment plans: Discuss possible treatments with your medical provider, such as therapy or medication.

How to Check In With Your Child

Discussing mental health regularly encourages children to be open and seek help when they need it. Try incorporating a quick check-in into your daily routine:

  • Dedicate at least 15 minutes for a discussion in a safe, distraction-free environment.
  • Ask open-ended questions and make sure your child is comfortable with and understands the topic.
  • Listen openly and reserve feedback until after they’ve expressed their thoughts. You can also paraphrase what they said to ensure you’ve interpreted their words correctly.
  • Validate their feelings and brainstorm solutions together, which can involve professional resources.

 

Common Mental Health Conditions

Children can experience a range of mental health conditions. While it’s best to consult a qualified health professional, educating yourself helps you recognize symptoms that you can bring up to your child’s doctor or psychologist.

Common conditions include:

  • Anxiety: Persistent and intense worry that may affect your child’s home, school and social life. Anxiety disorders include phobias, social anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder.
  • Depression: A mental health condition that involves feelings of sadness, hopelessness and loss of interest in previously enjoyable activities.
  • Borderline personality disorder: Characterized by difficulty regulating thoughts and emotions. Children with borderline personality disorder (BPD) often have unstable personal relationships and exhibit symptoms like impulsivity and mood swings.
  • Mood dysregulation: Marked by chronic irritability and constant tantrums. Children who experience mood dysregulation (DMDD) will express these symptoms consistently over time and in multiple settings.
  • Self-harm and suicidal thoughts: Life-threatening behaviors that children may engage in to cope. A professional can help you pinpoint the cause and develop healthy coping mechanisms.

 

Other Adolescent Challenges

Adolescents might face other challenges just for being themselves. Stigmas surrounding race and identity can impact your child’s happiness, relationships and health:

 

Free Mental Health Resources for Families

We’ve compiled a list of free mental health resources for families below. If you have one you’d like us to add, please let us know!

These online resources offer information for parents of teenagers and adolescents. They cover numerous mental health conditions through videos, brochures, guides and other mediums:

 

Explore Our Resources for Teens and Parents

Seeing your child happy and healthy is all a parent could ask for. At Hillside®, our mission is to provide you with the tools and knowledge you need to support them. We help your child or teen heal through treatments like dialectical behavioral therapy, horticulture therapy and others. To learn more about our services, reach out to us today.

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